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Immunity: A Traditional European Recipe for Daily Health

elderberry immunity tea

Our company exists to help empower wellness through tea. We develop every product with this mission as our goal. 

For 2021, we've reformulated our beloved Cold Buster herbal blend to a base of elderberries. The berries and flowers of elderberry are packed with antioxidants and vitamins. It has been used medicinally for centuries to fight infections, clear up complexions, and boost immunity. This rich source of phytochemicals is considered by some to be a holy grail solution for treating colds and the flu. Elderberries come from an elder tree variety indigenous to Europe, known as Sambucus.

*Please note that elderberry has not been proven to prevent COVID-19. No published research studies have evaluated the use of elderberry for COVID-19*

Our new immunity blend is based on a recipe for a natural cold cure from Europe. It is rich in natural sources of Vitamin C from rose hips, hibiscus, orange and lemon peel, and polyphenol antioxidants from elderberries, echinacea, and cinnamon. We add tulsi holy basil and ginseng for energy balance and a touch of sleepy valerian, to promote good rest. 

Colds are awful, and the bad news is you’re bound to get one sooner or later. According to the CDC, most adults in the U.S. get two to three colds a year, and while colds are most common during… well, the colder months, you can get one any time of the year [1]. There are a few things you can do that can reduce your risk, such as washing your hands, not touching your face, or staying away from sick people whenever possible, but when you do get a cold, a hot mug of herbal tea could bring you some comfort. 

According to a recent New York Times article, warm liquids can help with sore throats, chills, and coughing [2]. Furthermore, staying hydrated is a great way to keep yourself feeling as best you can when you have a cold—especially if you have a fever or other symptoms that could contribute to dehydration. Immunity is specially crafted to be loaded with ingredients that have been used as traditional cold cure remedies for centuries.

View Organic Immunity Tea

 

Ingredients:

  • Organic Elderberries - Popularly used in folk medicine for a number of reasons, some studies have found that elderberries may help with cold and flu symptoms [3]

  • Organic Cinnamon bark - Used in traditional medicine, some studies suggest that cinnamon may help with different metabolic aspects, including insulin regulation [4]

  • Organic Rooibos, aka red tea - This doesn’t come from the camellia sinensis plant, but provides a rich source of antioxidants, including some unique polyphenols, including aspalathin. This sweet-tasting caffeine-free herbal hails from South Africa’s Cedarberg mountain region, and has been consumed for hundreds of years as a phytoprotective brew to help protect against free radical damage that leads to conditions like diabetes, heart disease, and skin disorders. It is very low in tannins, giving it a pleasantly smooth and mild taste [5]

  • Organic Rose hips - Particularly high in Vitamin C, which may reduce length and severity of colds in certain groups [6]

  • Organic Orange peel - High in Vitamin C, which may reduce length and severity of colds in certain groups [7]

  • Organic Hibiscus Petals - Touted for its support of the cardiovascular system, hypertension, and relief of cramping, hibiscus is also a strong source of Vitamin C [8] [9] 

  • Organic Ginger root - Used for over two thousand years in traditional asian medicine, ginger may help with nausea [10]

  • Organic Ginseng root - Traditionally used for medicinal and culinary reasons, ginseng root may help with a variety of issues, including sleep, cognitive performance, and diabetes [11]

  • Organic Cardamom seeds

  • Organic Echinacea root - Some research suggests Echinacea may slightly reduce one’s risk of catching colds [12]

  • Organic Tulsi holy basil leaf - Popular in India, several studies on Tulsi have noted positive effects on stress and anxiety as well as hematological benefits [13] [14]

  • Organic Calendula - Some information suggests calendula may be beneficial for rashes, infection, and inflammation [15]

  • Organic Lemon Peel

  • Organic Valerian root - Some studies would suggest that Valerian can help with sleep [16]

 

References: 

[1] CDC - Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others - https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html#:~:text=Adults%20have%20an%20average%20of,any%20time%20of%20the%20year. July 9, 2021

[2]O’Connor, Anahad. “The Claim: Hot Liquids Can Ease Symptoms of a Cold or Flu.” New York Times, Jan. 26, 2009, https://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/27/health/27really.html. July 9, 2021

[3] Elderberry. August 2020. Nation Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/elderberry.

[4] Qin, B., Panickar, K. S., & Anderson, R. A. (2010). Cinnamon: potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Journal of diabetes science and technology, 4(3), 685–693. https://doi.org/10.1177/193229681000400324

[5]Joubert, D. de Beer, Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) beyond the farm gate: From herbal tea to potential phytopharmaceutical, South African Journal of Botany, Volume 77, Issue 4, 2011, Pages 869-886, ISSN 0254-6299 

[6] https://ods.od.nih.gov/pubs/usdandb/VitaminC-Content.pdf#search=%22rose%20hip%22

[7] Vitamin C. March 26, 2021. Nation Institute of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional/

[8] Diane L. McKay, C-Y. Oliver Chen, Edward Saltzman, Jeffrey B. Blumberg, Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. Tea (Tisane) Lowers Blood Pressure in Prehypertensive and Mildly Hypertensive Adults, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 140, Issue 2, February 2010, Pages 298–303,

[9] Salem MZM, Olivares-Perez J, Salem AZM (2014) Studies on biological activities and phytochemicals composition of Hibiscus species-A review. Life Sci. J. 11:1-8

[10] Ginger. December 2020. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/ginger

[11] Choi J, Kim T-H, Choi T-Y, Lee MS (2013) Ginseng for Health Care: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials in Korean Literature. PLoS ONE 8(4): e59978. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0059978

[12] Echinacea. Jul. 2020. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/echinacea

[13] Jamshidi, N., & Cohen, M. M. (2017). The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Tulsi in Humans: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2017, 9217567. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9217567

[14] Singletary, Keith W. PhD Basil: A Brief Summary of Potential Health Benefits, Nutrition Today: 3/4 2018 - Volume 53 - Issue 2 - p 92-97 doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000267

[15] Calendula. Jan. 11, 2021. Medline Plus. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/235.html

[16] Fernández-San-Martín MI, Masa-Font R, Palacios-Soler L, Sancho-Gómez P, Calbó-Caldentey C, Flores-Mateo G. Effectiveness of Valerian on insomnia: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Sleep Med. 2010 Jun;11(6):505-11. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2009.12.009. Epub 2010 Mar 26. PMID: 20347389.

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